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Feature Artist: Amy Hoffman

Posted on June 20, 2013 | 0 Comments

"Amy immigrated to Canada from Wisconsin in 1977.  She settled permanently in Yellowknife in 1995.  Following a conversion experience in Inuvik in 1983, which was examined and validated by a priest, she began tentatively trying to make rosaries around 1993, fumbling with bits of wire and beads at first, back then.  Now the rosaries she designs and makes by hand range from fairly simple to more elaborate, with the aim of making them personal, symbolic, and works of art.  But it's always about PRAYER."

Feature Artist: Caroline Blechert of Creations for Continuity

Posted on June 13, 2013 | 0 Comments

"Recognizing the beauty in things brings me great joy and inspiration, and it makes me curious about what it might inspire me to create. In interpreting the beauty around me, I find it satisfying to experience the beauty I am able to create within my own artwork. As an artist I am very aware of my surroundings and constantly looking for inspiration in my environment. I especially notice colour combinations that naturally occur in nature. Shapes, forms and designs in the world around me catch my interest. While I find urban centres to be full of stimulation, I also enjoy rural environments and the world of nature, as well as the contrast between them, such as the small flower growing up between the cracks in the sidewalk. My greatest inspiration however comes from examining culture and how it evolves. I believe deep-rooted traditions connect us to the past and to the legacy of our ancestors, and have an impact on us.

For me personally, my Inuvialuit background is an important part of my identity. It is my heritage and so has meaning for me, which I carry inside of myself. Yet we live in a modern world and the richness of one culture combines with new cultures, and both become changed. I find it interesting to look at those changes and to see how cultures are shaped by their environments. New materials, designs and techniques combine with the old and this is an important aspect of my approach to art. It is my roots in the Inuvialuit culture which form a departure point from which I can spread my wings to create unique new art forms which intertwine the meaningful traditions of my past with fresh new modern techniques of my present. Each thing which I create is shaped partly by my own personal and cultural values, and it is also filled with a life of its own. I enjoy creating pieces that combine the ancient with the modern in both technique and design. For instance, I use a variety of traditional northern materials, such as tanned caribou hide, baleen, moose hair, antler, porcupine quills and dentalium shells, as well as contemporary materials such as computer-cut delica beads, chain, silver, and crystal. Out of this synthesis, I create my own personal style and vision of beauty. I have been an artist all of my life, and first began creating jewelry when I started using a loom to make bracelets at age 12, which I later began to sell locally at age 15. 

My first major accomplishment was by age 17 as I was surprised and honoured to accept the award for Best Emerging Artist at the largest festival here in the north, the Great Northern Arts Festival (GNAF) in Inuvik. It was also an opportunity to return to my mother’s native land where I could experience and explore more about my Inuvialuit culture and visit among other encouraging and inspiring artists. At age 18, I won Best Jewelry Artist at the festival and have been delighted to be accepted back for 6 years altogether. Each year I find myself more focused and inspired, and looking forward to finally furthering my jewelry training. I realize now that since I was 17, I have been searching for my artistic medium and means of expression. And in all the college courses I have taken, since I left high school, I was continuously drawn back to culture and to jewelry. Even when completing my textile arts design diploma, I used my learned techniques to create jewelry and items of adornment, and am looking forward to learning more techniques to add to my store of resources from which to draw in order to further my vision and my exploration of art."

 

Winner of the Caribou Rattle is...

Posted on May 31, 2013 | 0 Comments

Chelsea Vowel! Masi Cho for all the likes and shares on our Facebook Site.  We hope you enjoy our new store site. 

 

The Art of Drum Making - VIDEO

Posted on May 30, 2013 | 0 Comments

Great video on drum-making workshop held at the Ekati Diamond mine in the Northwest Territories. Features Philip and Rosa Huskey of Behchoko, NT. 

The video shows how wood and caribou hide are used to make the drums. It also explains the integral role of the drum in the Tlicho way of life and sense of community, and offers an example of the importance of the oral tradition in Aboriginal culture.

Throughout the video, the elders speak in Tlicho. Subtitles are provided.  See the FULL VIDEO HERE

Posted in native artists, native crafts

Feature Artist: Ray McSwain

Posted on May 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Ray is a young artist living in Edzo. He graduated from the Chief Jimmy Bruneau Regional High School and completed a certificate in Jewellery and Metalwork from Aurora College in 2000. Ray has been painting for the last 20 years and creates pictures, murals, art on paddles, and even art for motor vehicle front grills. His works are currently on display in the Chief Jimmy Bruneau School in Edzo, the Range Lake North School in Yellowknife and in BHP Billiton and Diavik Diamond Mines offices in Yellowknife. He has illustrated a children’s book of Tlicho legends which is to be published this year.

Posted in native artists, native crafts

Feature Artist: James Wedzin

Posted on May 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

James is a Tlicho artist from Behchoko, NT. He was born and raised by his grandmother in the community of Behchoko, Northwest Territories. James praises his grandmother for inspiring and encouraging his early interest in traditional art. He watched her intricate bead work endlessly and developed his own sense of style in Art.

He started at age four and by age fourteen his talents developed to the point that his art work was a demand. He started selling his creations and became a full-time artist.

Today, you can find James work in galleries and in the hands of many private collectors. James is on of the better known aboriginal artists in Canada for his Northern landscapes, animal imagery and Northern lights.

Posted in native artists, native crafts

Feature Artist: Archie Beaulieu

Posted on May 14, 2013 | 0 Comments

Archie Beaulieu is a well established artist with an international reputation who lives in Behchoko. Beaulieu's images primarily depict the animals of northern Canada and the traditions of the Dene people. When asked where he gets his ideas for his printings, Archie replied; "I get a lot of my ideas when I am out on the land. Sometimes, I even get them from my dreams." Over the past twenty years, his works have been exhibited all over North America, and have won several major awards.

His originals can be found in the collections of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II and Pope John Paul II. Paintings and prints have been purchased by members of government, dignitaries, corporations and collectors worldwide. His work can be seen and purchased at Nor-Art International Gallery in Yellowknife, NT. See their site at www.nor-art.com or call toll-free 1-866-233-4533. Archie Beaullieu  Contact the artist: Archie Beaullieu Behchokö, NT X0E 0Y0 Telephone: E-mail: A portfolio of my work:

Posted in native artists, native crafts

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