Įłàà katı̀ (Few Words, Much Meaning) Traditional Knowledge

Posted on September 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

The Tłı̨chǫ Government, the Canadian Polar Commission and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre are co-hosting a multi-event symposium on traditional knowledge this weekend from 20-21, 2014 at the Explorer Hotel!  

Hope to see you out there, excited to checkout the Traditional Knowledge Showcase exhibit.  Learn more about the Transitional Knowledge Festival here

Below is the list of Presenters, Featured Speakers and Panel Contributors:

  • Paul AndrewBROADCASTER
  • Joanne BarnabyFOUNDING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DENE CULTURAL INSTITUTE
  • Kirsten Carthew - FILMMAKER
  • Wade DavisPROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
  • George Dei - PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO, ONTARIO INSTITUTE FOR STUDIES IN EDUCATION
  • Stephen Ellis - NORTHERN SENIOR ASSOCIATE, TIDES CANADA
  • Joe ErasmusELDER, HEALING WIND ADVISORY COUNCIL
  • Tim Ingold - PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF ABERDEEN
  • Stephanie Irlbacher-FoxPOLITICAL ANALYST, AUTHOR
  • Joseph JudasELDER, TŁĮCHǪ ODAɁA ADVISORY COUNCIL, TŁĮCHǪ ASSEMBLY MEMBER
  • Paul NadasdyASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY, CORNELL UNIVERSITY
  • Dëneze Nakehk'o - RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCASTER
  • George NicholasPROFESSOR OF ARCHAEOLOGY, SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
  • Jimmy B. Rabesca - ELDER, TŁĮCHǪ ODAɁA ADVISORY COUNCIL
  • Mary Adele RabescaELDER, HEALING WIND ADVISORY COUNCIL
  • Adolfo Ruiz - GRAPHIC DESIGNER, FILMMAKER
  • Suzanne Stewart - ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF INDIGENOUS HEALING IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY, OISE
  • Richard Van Camp - STORYTELLER AND AUTHOR
  • Kelsey WrightsonPHD STUDENT
  • John B. Zoe - SPECIAL ADVISOR TO THE TŁĮCHǪ GOVERNMENT, CHAIRPERSON TŁĮCHǪ RESEARCH & TRAINING INSTITUTE

Photo of the late Adele Wedawin, who is holding sinew strips. 

Our ancestors have used sinew thread since the beginning of time and still use it to this day.  People travelled long distances to hunt caribou for their muscle strip, which is the long, thick muscle from the back leg of the caribou that is  made into sinew.  The sinew is dried and woven by hand for many hours, then soaked in water to loosen the strip. Once loose, the strip is then woven by hand again for many hours. Once this is done, it is shredded into fine strips of thread and ready for sewing. There were no needles in the past, so sinew was used as a needle and thus, many things could be made with it. Sinew thread was used to make tents, pants, moccasins, shirts, dresses, jackets and mitts.  Taken from Tlicho Government display. Photo by Tessa Macintosh. 


Celebrate Northwest Territories Arts Week from Sept 20-28, 2014

Please welcome Naomi Bourque to the Tlicho Online Store.

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